It’s 9 a.m. it must be time for…

There is no such thing as the same old routine when you make your living raising pigs. While there are days when you ship pigs, days when you wean pigs and days when you get feed – no two days are ever the same. There is always something new around the corner and interesting hurdles to overcome.

For that reason, we asked one member of okPORK to document what happened on a single day on the farm – moment by moment. Those moments are shared here to help you to understand how a day moves behind the biosecure doors of an Oklahoma farm.

What I got in return was an accounting of several days – both on and off the farm. How do your days compare to the those of a farmer?

Meet Tina who farms in southeastern Oklahoma. She and her husband Ben rock through life with five kids – a daughter who is 18, one who is 13, another who is 10, and twin eight-year-old boys. With two pig farms, goats, hay, dance practice, soccer games, church and everything else life throws at them this family intimately understands the phrase “burning the candle at both ends.”

Sound familiar? Tina kept a diary of a few days during hay season. Scroll to experience a Day in the Life of Tina.

At 8 a.m. we are out the door. I snagged the wheel of the tractor and one of my sons joined me. Since we have a buddy seat in the newest tractor we often take one of the kids with us while we work. It’s great to be able to spend one-on-one time while at the same time practicing the family’s work ethic. We head to the hay field and begin raking.

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11:30 a.m. rolls around and we head to the house for lunch and a quick pit stop in the bathroom. I cook lunch for the family and manage to get the kitchen cleaned afterward.

Feeling refreshed after finishing lunch by 12:30, this time I head back to the field with my daughter who is 10. We all make sure we take turns in the buddy seat, so everyone gets a chance to feel the love. Once we start baling hay we don’t stop until the sun retires for the day.

When 5:30 p.m. rolls around, we switch fields. We also stop by the house and I managed to make a meatloaf for dinner. I got to put it in the oven but my 18-year-old daughter took over then. She was in charge of taking it out of the oven when the timer chimed in an hour.

About the time I should have been having dinner (7:30 p.m.) a bale managed to get stuck in the baler. I was able to go back to baling, but only after the fun of digging out the problem bale.

9:45 p.m. saw me sliding into my HOME sweet home. It was at this point I finally was able to sit down at the desk in my home office to do some quick work on the computer.

A few minutes after 10 p.m. I knocked off the dirt with a shower before finally getting to finish dinner at 10:50 p.m. by making mashed potatoes to accompany the meatloaf we made earlier. Finally, the parts of the family who are home sit down to eat.

It wasn’t until 11:05 p.m. that I was able to head into town to drop a deposit for my 13-year-old daughter’s solo dance class (which was due the next day). I knew I would be unable to take it later since the hay fields would be waiting again tomorrow.

It was 11:40 p.m. before my husband and my last two kids (the other 8-year-old and the 13-year-old) got home. This is when they finally finished hauling hay and were able to eat.

At 11:45 p.m. I return from town, we start showers. We finally all fall into bed by about midnight.

It is now Friday at 7 a.m. I am up, making breakfast, getting all five kids organized for the day, I then run through the shower and get dressed. I head to my desk for over-due phone calls, emails and mail.  As soon as I finish, I’m outside to load the tractor and baler onto the goose-neck trailer and hook the rake onto the other truck.

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My husband and I head to our other farm 52 miles away – he pulls the goose-neck and I tow the hay rake with the other truck. Since we are expecting an extremely long day, we don’t bring any of the kids with us. When we arrive we immediately get set up and I rake hay until dark while my husband bales behind me.

It takes us an hour to get back to town and at 10 p.m. we do a drive thru for dinner. While we are in town we pick up our daughter from her grandparents house. Mercifully we then get to go home, shower and crawl into bed.

Are you having fun learning about Tina’s life on the farm? Tune in for the next post where Tina and her family take care of the goats and work around the pig farm. 

 

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